The Taradiddle Tribune – 4/8/2014

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It was a typical Turning Tuesday yesterday at Codger Lodge. There were doughnuts to dispose of, stories to relate, and projects to plan.pic-set1
Working to complete current projects is a part of every Turning Tuesday.pic-set2
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This week we had fine examples of completed projects. Mike Sharps brought his latest segmented urn. Jimmy Morrison had a holly bowl and a natural-edge maple burl creation.
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John Smith finished his well-executed laminated fruit bowl, John Wolf turned a flawless lidded box, and Walt Tuttle displayed his fine segmented bowl.

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I finished an Adirondack chaise project for the June/July Issue #59 of Woodcraft Magazine.
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The ever-helpful codgers took care of the field testing.  I doubt that Tom Sawyer’s methods will entice the codgers to participate in the painting of the chair.

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The Empty Bowls project was a success. Frank has a follow-up story on the charity event that benefits local food pantries and the codgers’ participation. Frank’s Woodworking Adventures Blog keeps us up to date on woodworking related events and Woodcraft’s involvement, as well as the events at Codger Lodge.

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This week after the codgers had called it a day, Mikey and I visited with the Cub Scouts of Pack 129. The cubs have a program similar to the merit badge curriculum of the older boys in Scouting. The cubs earn “belt loops” while learning to be good citizens in the community. Mikey gave the boys insight into the challenges of being handicapped and how he deals with those challenges. The boys had many questions for Mikey and gained a new perspective on how to interact with and assist folks who are wheelchair bound.  The little guy on the left, Shaun, is my grandson. (I had to mention that to maintain my good standing in the Grandpa club.)

The codgers of the lodge, without exception, are generous and enthusiastic when it comes to helping others. I feel privileged to associate with them.

We plan to do it all again next week. Come on down and join us on Turning Tuesday at Codger Lodge.
Regards,
Bill

Mourn the dragons.

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I suspect that Jimmy and Henry patronize the same milliner.

 

The Taradiddle Tribune – 4/2/2014

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We do not have quarters for muster to convey the “plan of the day” at Codger Lodge nor a First Sargent to dispense duty assignments and motivational words. Through experience, we codgers have developed a level of situational awareness that prepares us to ascertain what is required and to establish our priorities without supervision. We are capable and self-motivated.
This week at the lodge there were two boxes of doughnuts, a large tray of cookies, a bag of biscotti, a pecan pie, and Girl Scout cookies in reserve. Without hesitation or encouragement, the codgers established a plan to dispose of these sweets and set the highest priority for that task.pic set 1After a furious beginning, the battle subsided, allowing the codgers to regroup, regain their momentum, and continue the cookie campaign at a leisurely pace.pic set 2Refreshed and ready, the codgers planed their Turning Tuesday activities and executed their plans.pic set 3pic set 4_5 The show and tell items reflected the talents of the codgers and codgerettes. Walt Tuttle had a nice segmented bowl and Mike Sharps displayed two of his laminated pieces,pic set 6 Joanie Smith sent one of her excellent pecan pies and Jimmy Morrison brought a segmented piece and a large ambrosia salad bowl for our enjoyment, pic set 7 Gene Smith turned two nice bowls from laminated blanks and Linda Williams baked up a tray of fine peanut butter cookies. The cookies are from one of Linda’s “go to” recipes and they are good,pic set 8

pic set 9This is not another metal sculpture idea from Henry Aglio’s fertile mind taking shape; but rather a random arrangement of Jimmy Morrison’s bowl turning tool rests. While the flowing curves are somewhat reminiscent of Henry’s style, his presentations are considerably more refined and creative.

??????????There are fifty-some bowls in our Empty Bowls collection and they are on their way to be delivered for the charity event. The soup lunch will be held on Saturday, April 5th in Marietta, OH. Frank reported the event in his Woodcraft blog. (Empty Bowls). Thanks to all the codgers who turned and donated bowls to this worthwhile cause.DSCN4287

We are planning another codger convention next Turning Tuesday at the lodge. Come on down and join us.

Regards,
Bill

Mourn the dragons.
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Codger Lodge & The Taradiddle Tribune

DSCN4073aRecipe-BoxThis is written by a fine woodworking comrade, Bill Sands of Lubeck, West Virginia, who has taught us much in the patients and fortitude of woodworking. In his spare time Bill is also a master woodworker in his own right, and contributor to Woodcraft Magazine. He has done much for his surrounding communities, charities, and for many area woodworkers. He opens his doors, knowledge, heart and soul to all, along with a great sense of humor.  Above, Bill holds a Bubinga board from Woodcraft, that he helped this blogger through his patience and guidance of teaching safety in use of power and hand tools, to turn the board into this beautiful recipe box for my daughter.

We bring this preface to you followed by a weekly continuance article complete with photos from The Taradiddle Tribune written by Bill Sands.  The articles will contain jovial fellow woodworkers and camaraderie from the events that take place on Turning Tuesdays’ at Bill’s workshop, more commonly known as Codger Lodge.

by Author, Bill Sands:
Welcome to Codger Lodge. If you are inclined to associate with old folks who have a propensity for woodworking; this is a good place to spend some time. We codgers gather at a shop in Lubeck, WV each Tuesday to pursue our woodworking interests and related activities. Codger Lodge sports a renowned doughnut disposal team and we are diligent in maintaining our proficiency. Prevarication without malice is another common activity. Routinely, the codgers indulge in many forms of woodworking, with turning being the most prevalent discipline.
We codgers thrive on camaraderie and our group is bound by a bond of friendship. Our meetings are informal and governed by the Golden Rule rather than Robert’s Rules of Order. Everyone at Codger Lodge has a key to the executive restroom. Each of us is a CFO. Our treasury consists of two recycled plastic CD containers where voluntary contributions are made to the kitchen fund and the shop-supplies fund. We maintain a coffee pot and a refrigerator that is stocked with pop, water, and beer. When Turning Tuesday winds down and the power tools are unplugged, some of us enjoy a glass of beer while reflecting on the simple pleasures of the day shared with good friends at Codger Lodge.Turning Tuesdays' at Codger LodgeIt all began with Mikey, who suffered a fall that left him paralyzed from his chest down and drastically altered his active lifestyle. He is an electrician who enjoyed many outdoor activities before the accident. Mikey sees the glass as half-full and never half-empty. He dwells on things that he can accomplish and not his diminished physical abilities. After Mike recovered and adjusted his lifestyle to fit his circumstances, he disclosed a desire to learn basic woodworking skills.

??????????He and I began meeting in my workshop once or twice a week to ground him in the basic milling and wood joining techniques. He developed the skills quickly and we were progressing to more complex projects when, during one fateful session, Mikey asked about the mini-lathe in the shop. He expressed a desire to try woodturning. We mounted the lathe at his comfortable working level and I taught him everything that I know about turning.

New Picture??????????It became apparent that Mikey was destined to be a wood turner and needed more advanced instruction and advice than I could provide. We invited two accomplished turners, Jimmy and Tom, to join our Tuesday sessions in the shop.

Mikey finished his green wood poplar bowl

DSCN5146From that early beginning, the program rapidly expanded. Mikey’s turning skills increased and he acquired a more powerful lathe with a larger capacity to facilitate his progression toward larger bowls and segmented pieces. More woodworkers began showing up to share their knowledge and demonstrate their skills. Over a period of two years Turning Tuesday evolved into a social gathering as well as a woodworking skill share.

Currently, twelve to fifteen friends, on average, visit the shop on Tuesday. Realizing that most of us are fortunate to be retired and may be considered codgers, we began referring to the shop as Codger Lodge and our gathering as Turning Tuesday.

DSCN2719Mikey is an inspiration to us all. He accepts his paralysis without complaints and he is relentless in perusing his goals. He has surmounted all obstacles and become an accomplished turner in his own right. Mikey’s lathe is his passion and “Flat work” woodworking has gone by the wayside. The pattern routed hand-mirror project that we were working on before he was attracted to the mini-lathe is still stored in the shop, waiting to be completed.

The poet, Ella Wheeler Wilcox, never met Mikey; however, she must have known someone like him to inspire this work.

The Winds of Fate
One ship drives east and another drives west
With the selfsame winds that blow.
Tis the set of the sails
And not the gales
That tell them the way to go.

Like the winds of the sea are the ways of fate,
As we voyage along through life.
Tis the set of the soul
That decides its goal,
And not the calm or the strife.

Feel free to drop in anytime for a visit. We’ll keep you updated on the proceedings at Codger Lodge (http://www.codgerlodge.com/), and you may make new friends of your own.Taradiddle Tribune Logo HeaderLook for a new chapter from the Taradiddle Tribune every week, here on Woodshop Demos.

How To Make A Square Bowl by Matthew (Dean) Wilson

Matthew D. Wilson is MDWoodart.  He has a moderate 2-car shop garage and creates furniture, boxes, chess boards, wooden jewelry, turning items, and vintage radio restoration, some with upcycles to MP3 Players. You can check out his woodworking world at MDWoodart.com.

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In this blog, Matthew shows us how to create a square wood bowl.  Pick your favorite wood in any choice of size, about 1″ thick or more, depending upon what you want your finished thickness to be.
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Begin smoothing one face of the board with a hand-plane or joiner, then smooth an edge as well.  Rip the board to choice width.
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Cross-Cut the board to make a perfect square, then mark the corner to corner punch the center.

square_bowl-017 square_bowl-020 square_bowl-023Place your faceplate on the square and align the marks with the holes. then simply punch a divot for the drill bit to fit into.

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Mount the faceplate and blank to the lathe.  Create a recess and mount the chuck to the recess.

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Remove the faceplate, attach the chuck with blank to the lathe, and begin the turning process.  Matthew uses the Easy Wood Full Size Finisher to create the inside shape of the bowl.

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After completion of cutting the inside shape of the bowl, cut the underside shape and sand the entire bowl. Apply your finish of choice.  Woodcraft carries General Finishes Polyacrylic water-based top coats in flat, satin, semi-gloss and gloss applications.  another fine choice would be the Waterlox Finish products, also at Woodcraft.

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Two finished square bowls that can be used as coasters, a jewelry tray, paper clip holders for your desk, or for whatever your imagination and design requirements may be.

Contact Matthew at MDWoodart and have him create something for you today!

Don’t have a blog site?  Want to be a guest blogger on Woodshop Demos?  Contact Woodcraft at frank_byers@woodcraft.com.  It’s FREE!